Racial Disparities in COVID-19 Mortality Among Essential Workers in the United States

May 5, 2021, 7:00:00 PM

12 - 1 PM PT | 2 - 3 PM CT | 3 - 4 PM ET

Speaker(s)

Dr. Tiana N. Rogers

Tiana N. Rogers, PhD is Director of Data, Policy, and Performance Innovation at Sorenson Impact Center, a socially conscious think tank located within the University of Utah's Eccles School of Business. She leads a variety of portfolios using data to inform government and not-for-profit entities with capacity building in various areas. Her career has focused on conducting research and serving as a field expert in the areas of homelessness, child welfare & maltreatment, public health & policy, and racial disparities. In addition to being a published author with teaching experience, Dr. Rogers also consults with national and international social service organizations on program evaluation and development.

About the webinar:

As COVID-19 deaths rise, existing structural inequalities continue to shape racial disparities. This webinar will investigate the racial disparities in COVID-19 mortality among America’s essential workers. Data from the American Community Survey and Current Population Survey was used to examine the relationship between COVID-19 deaths and occupational differences across racial / ethnic groups and states.

Learning Objectives:

At the completion of this activity, the learner will be able to:

- Examine COVID-19 trends among essential workers
- Describe the relationship between the number of COVID-19 deaths and job differences across racial / ethnic groups and states
- Discuss policy implications and the need for disaggregation of state-level data by race/ethnicity to ensure equitable and evidence-based response and recovery efforts

Accessibility:

If you require an accommodation for effective communication (ASL interpreting/CART captioning, alternative media formats, etc.) to fully participate in this event, please contact Michelle Meyer at (510) 642-8365 or mmeyer@berkeley.edu with as much advance notice as possible and at least 7-10 days in advance of the event.